Julia Raath - A still life for a still life exhibition
Julia Raath - A still life for a still life exhibition
Julia Raath - A still life for a still life exhibition
Julia Raath - A still life for a still life exhibition
Julia Raath - A still life for a still life exhibition
Julia Raath - A still life for a still life exhibition
Julia Raath - A still life for a still life exhibition
Julia Raath - A still life for a still life exhibition
Julia Raath - A still life for a still life exhibition
Julia Raath - A still life for a still life exhibition
Julia Raath - A still life for a still life exhibition
Julia Raath - A still life for a still life exhibition
Julia Raath - A still life for a still life exhibition
Julia Raath - A still life for a still life exhibition
Julia Raath - A still life for a still life exhibition
Julia Raath - A still life for a still life exhibition
Julia Raath - A still life for a still life exhibition
Julia Raath - A still life for a still life exhibition
Julia Raath - A still life for a still life exhibition
Julia Raath - A still life for a still life exhibition
Julia Raath - A still life for a still life exhibition
Julia Raath - A still life for a still life exhibition
Julia Raath - A still life for a still life exhibition
Julia Raath - A still life for a still life exhibition
Julia Raath - A still life for a still life exhibition
Julia Raath - A still life for a still life exhibition
Julia Raath - A still life for a still life exhibition
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Julia Raath - A still life for a still life exhibition

Julia Raath has always been a contributor to The Boroughs, more recently through the social enterprise, she established in India that assists women to create an income from their craft. 

This is her first exhibition at the Boroughs

"I was home, but away from my home, and unsure about how long I would be there. Before the first Australian lockdown descended, I took myself to the city I grew up in to spend time with my mother. At first, I felt like I was in a doctor’s waiting room without a pile of old magazines to flick through to bide the time. The prescription was to get a routine. It started with a daily walk, enjoying the autumnal weather, collecting feathers, fallen branches and flowers on nature strips. I set a goal to paint a still life every day for 100 days. It was good medicine."

Here is a selection of the 100-day collection.

Julia is a textile print designer based in Melbourne, who has taught extensively across Higher and Vocational Education in Australia and India, including Textile Design at RMIT and the University of Technology, Sydney. Julia’s work is represented in collections of the National Gallery of Victoria and University of Technology and many private collections.

You can find Julia's limited edition chai/spice chocolate here.